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10-Jan-2020 05:09

We always think we are insulated from this kind of thing.”Canadians often react this way when a grisly attack occurs in the country.But in fact it the kind of thing that happens there.

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His suicide note accused feminists of ruining his life.Between 20, indigenous women were six times more likely to be murdered than other women in Canada, according to a report by the national statistics agency, Statistics Canada.“Canada in its very founding as a nation-state is based in gender-based violence—on at least two counts,” said Robyn Bourgeois, an indigenous professor of women’s and gender studies at Brock University who has herself survived such violence.“Canada was founded on the deaths of indigenous women and girls.” Early colonial writings portrayed indigenous women as lewd and sexually available, which served to justify sexual violence against them.“That being said, I think maybe even if the government isn’t ready, Canadians are ready. And after seeing what happened in Toronto, I can’t imagine Canada continuing to turn a blind eye to the death toll of misogyny.”Even though Bourgeois said that for many years Canada did seem to largely ignore the death toll among indigenous women, she added that now, “people will be more likely to pay attention because this was in Toronto—in an urban center where there’s a lot of wealth. Some lives are worth more than others in this country.”That’s an uncomfortable thought for many proud Canadians, and many others around the world who perceive Canada as a paragon of gender equality and multiculturalism.The country has a lot more work to do—and the incel attack in Toronto is a reminder.

His suicide note accused feminists of ruining his life.Between 20, indigenous women were six times more likely to be murdered than other women in Canada, according to a report by the national statistics agency, Statistics Canada.“Canada in its very founding as a nation-state is based in gender-based violence—on at least two counts,” said Robyn Bourgeois, an indigenous professor of women’s and gender studies at Brock University who has herself survived such violence.“Canada was founded on the deaths of indigenous women and girls.” Early colonial writings portrayed indigenous women as lewd and sexually available, which served to justify sexual violence against them.“That being said, I think maybe even if the government isn’t ready, Canadians are ready. And after seeing what happened in Toronto, I can’t imagine Canada continuing to turn a blind eye to the death toll of misogyny.”Even though Bourgeois said that for many years Canada did seem to largely ignore the death toll among indigenous women, she added that now, “people will be more likely to pay attention because this was in Toronto—in an urban center where there’s a lot of wealth. Some lives are worth more than others in this country.”That’s an uncomfortable thought for many proud Canadians, and many others around the world who perceive Canada as a paragon of gender equality and multiculturalism.The country has a lot more work to do—and the incel attack in Toronto is a reminder.Indigenous girls and boys were forcibly removed from their families and subjected to abuse in the residential school system, which operated from the 1800s until the 1990s.