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02-Dec-2019 06:58

In 2006 alone, United helped erase 6.8 million hundredweight potato sacks from the U. Response to this news was uniformly horrified, but the truth is, in much of the West, produce is destroyed every day of every week, on a much larger scale, and for a reason even more offensive than profit: aesthetics.

We’ve grown accustomed in North America to fancy supermarkets with shiny, unblemished fruits and vegetables.

A farmer, meanwhile, estimated that fully one-third of his crop is out-graded for cosmetic reasons, creating mountains of reject potatoes: outsized, double-lobed, too big, too small, too wonky, with eyes, not perfectly smooth, not perfectly rounded—all, of course, perfectly edible.

In Britain, government law actually makes it illegal to sell carrots of less than one centimetre in diameter, and those with a fork, or secondary branch—all naturally occurring features.

Within a year of forming, however, United was facing public revulsion: the consortium, it turned out, was asking farmers to destroy crops to boost prices.

In a single year, the Idaho chapter took roughly four million 100-lb.

By managing supply, and keeping demand—and prices—high, the United Potato Growers of America, which later helped found a Canadian counterpart, aims to be the OPEC of spuds.

The European Commission estimates that 40 to 60 per cent of all fish caught by European fleets are thrown back to sea because they are too small, or the wrong species (Greenpeace puts the figure even higher, suggesting that 117 million of the 186 million fish caught in U. (When waste from scraps, rot, fishmeal and inedible matter are taken into account, the amount of fish-based protein actually consumed amounts to just 10 per cent of the marine animals removed annually from the oceans, according to Charles Clover, author of estimates that the oceans have already lost more than 90 per cent of large predatory fishes, like cod, salmon and tuna).

Consumers do not escape blame for the mammoth waste problem: the average American throws away 96 kg of edible food each year.

(“There’s no grey area in retail,” he adds with a rueful chuckle.) Laws, perversely, seem to bolster food waste.

In the Europe, apples under 50 mm in diameter or 70 grams in weight have been banned.

By managing supply, and keeping demand—and prices—high, the United Potato Growers of America, which later helped found a Canadian counterpart, aims to be the OPEC of spuds.The European Commission estimates that 40 to 60 per cent of all fish caught by European fleets are thrown back to sea because they are too small, or the wrong species (Greenpeace puts the figure even higher, suggesting that 117 million of the 186 million fish caught in U. (When waste from scraps, rot, fishmeal and inedible matter are taken into account, the amount of fish-based protein actually consumed amounts to just 10 per cent of the marine animals removed annually from the oceans, according to Charles Clover, author of estimates that the oceans have already lost more than 90 per cent of large predatory fishes, like cod, salmon and tuna).Consumers do not escape blame for the mammoth waste problem: the average American throws away 96 kg of edible food each year.(“There’s no grey area in retail,” he adds with a rueful chuckle.) Laws, perversely, seem to bolster food waste.In the Europe, apples under 50 mm in diameter or 70 grams in weight have been banned.Another example of systemic wastage has been dubbed “overproduction waste.” That is, manufacturers will make more of a product than supermarkets can actually sell; in the convenience-food sector (supplying ready-made meals and sandwiches) overproduction waste levels reach 56 per cent of a company’s total output, meaning that, yes, more food is being wasted than sold.