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26-Oct-2019 03:25

The naming of a Jewish child is a most profound spiritual moment.

The Sages say that naming a baby is a statement of her character, her specialness, and her path in life.

It may be for this reason that when naming after the prophet Isaiah – who was murdered – many Jews omit the last letter of his name (in Hebrew, Yeshaya instead of Yeshiyahu).

(Yam Shel Shlomo – Gittin ) Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetzky considered the age of 60 the demarcation between young and old.

It's a good idea to give a child a Hebrew name that can be used in English also – e.g. This way, your child not only has a Hebrew name, but he'll use it, too!

This can be an important hedge against assimilation; the Midrash (Bamidbar Raba ) says that the Jewish people were redeemed from Egypt partly in the merit of having kept their Jewish names.

This is a great honor to the deceased, because its soul can achieve an elevation based on the good deeds of the namesake.

The child, meanwhile, can be inspired by the good qualities of the deceased – and make a deep connection to the past.

In that case, if the living relative is closely related to the baby – parent, grandparent, or sibling – then you should not use the name. Sephardi Jews also name children after relatives who are still alive.

An angel comes to the parents and whispers the Jewish name that the new baby will embody. Ashkenazi Jews have the custom of naming a child after a relative who has passed away.

Yet this still doesn't seem to help parents from agonizing over which name to pick! And why is the father's name traditionally not given to a son – e.g. This keeps the name and memory alive, and in a metaphysical way forms a bond between the soul of the baby and the deceased relative.

This comes from the same root as the word "thanks." The letters can also be rearranged to spell out the holy Name of God.

The significance is that Leah wanted to particularly express her "thanks to God." (Genesis ) It is important to choose a name that will have a positive effect, since every time it is used the person is reminded of its meaning (Midrash Tanchuma – Ha'Azinu 7).

In that case, if the living relative is closely related to the baby – parent, grandparent, or sibling – then you should not use the name. Sephardi Jews also name children after relatives who are still alive.An angel comes to the parents and whispers the Jewish name that the new baby will embody. Ashkenazi Jews have the custom of naming a child after a relative who has passed away.Yet this still doesn't seem to help parents from agonizing over which name to pick! And why is the father's name traditionally not given to a son – e.g. This keeps the name and memory alive, and in a metaphysical way forms a bond between the soul of the baby and the deceased relative.This comes from the same root as the word "thanks." The letters can also be rearranged to spell out the holy Name of God.The significance is that Leah wanted to particularly express her "thanks to God." (Genesis ) It is important to choose a name that will have a positive effect, since every time it is used the person is reminded of its meaning (Midrash Tanchuma – Ha'Azinu 7).This source is from the Talmud, which records a child named after Rabbi Natan while he was still alive (Shabbat 134a).