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21-Sep-2019 19:09

Sarah, a 30-year-old graphic designer, met Matt through a colleague at the imaging tech company where they both worked."I didn't really notice him at first because he had a beard, and beards weren't my thing," she says."We took things slowly because we were both very aware that we worked in the same office," she remembers.But the caution was worth it: Five years after that first date, he proposed.But they exchanged a few texts, then graduated to friendly lunches.Eventually Matt asked Sarah on a date, and they talked for so long that the sushi restaurant had to kick them out.You might not always see eye to eye about things at work, which could cause work problems to become problems. Competing for the same projects or promotions could cause serious problems in your relationship; it could also cause one of you to bow out and losing out on great opportunities to grow professionally.

If she can make her looks work for her, who are you to stop it?

If that’s the case, consider the following tips for keeping the relationship happy and healthy: Meghan Stone earned her Master’s degree in Clinical Social Work and Master’s of Education in Human Sexuality from Widener University.

She has worked as a therapist, social worker, teen counselor, and sexuality educator.

Only one-third of office romances go long-term, so don't be shocked if it ends.

If you're a snot about your breakup, coworkers could (and honestly, should) take your ex's side.

If she can make her looks work for her, who are you to stop it?

If that’s the case, consider the following tips for keeping the relationship happy and healthy: Meghan Stone earned her Master’s degree in Clinical Social Work and Master’s of Education in Human Sexuality from Widener University.

She has worked as a therapist, social worker, teen counselor, and sexuality educator.

Only one-third of office romances go long-term, so don't be shocked if it ends.

If you're a snot about your breakup, coworkers could (and honestly, should) take your ex's side.

"Older generations saw work as a separate place," says Renee Cowan, Ph.