Geektools clock not updating

12-Jan-2020 11:57

For those of us who began playing with Geek Tool long ago, it was used in a very utilitarian fashion — the output was simple lines of text displayed on the Mac’s desktop (three year old screencast here shows what I mean).And while the content that we’re seeing displayed with Geek Tool hasn’t changed much, some designer-types out there have taken the display of that information to the next level.These scripts are meant to help advanced users better use CLI programs and build workflows for their research.Bash and R plotting scripts to monitor a demanding application and plot the results to 'png' or 'pdf'.Each script listed includes a screenshot of it running on the Mac desktop within Geek Tool, information on the script itself, and of course the ability to download the scripts. Once a tool employed mainly by hardcore users, Geek Tool seemed to begin exploding across OS X desktops in 2009.

geektools clock not updating-72

If you’re a Geek Tool user and you’re looking for a bunch of awesome Geek Tool scripts, look no further.

It’s pretty neat to see the way that Geek Tool can be used to morph meaningful data into specific wallpaper images, or going that extra yard, to coordinate with a custom GUI theme.

Clearly some people have a solid eye for design, and the time to monkey around and put in some extra awesome.

$BLINK_FILE # make sure blink file existsn=$(cat $BLINK_FILE) # get contents of blink file(( n % 2 == 0 )) && COLON=" " # modulo 2 the blink file value and if zero turn off colonecho "$" # display on (colon) or off (blank)echo $(((n 1) % 2)) You get to tell Geektook where the time script and the blinking colon script get positioned on the screen, and the refresh rate you want for each script.

I've provided comments on what each script line is doing, so hopefully you will be able to modify to suit your needs.

If you’re a Geek Tool user and you’re looking for a bunch of awesome Geek Tool scripts, look no further.It’s pretty neat to see the way that Geek Tool can be used to morph meaningful data into specific wallpaper images, or going that extra yard, to coordinate with a custom GUI theme.Clearly some people have a solid eye for design, and the time to monkey around and put in some extra awesome.$BLINK_FILE # make sure blink file existsn=$(cat $BLINK_FILE) # get contents of blink file(( n % 2 == 0 )) && COLON=" " # modulo 2 the blink file value and if zero turn off colonecho "$" # display on (colon) or off (blank)echo $(((n 1) % 2)) You get to tell Geektook where the time script and the blinking colon script get positioned on the screen, and the refresh rate you want for each script.I've provided comments on what each script line is doing, so hopefully you will be able to modify to suit your needs. My working solution used a file to keep track of whether the colon was on or off between invocations of the script.