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28-Sep-2019 00:13

The woman in front of him was bent forward, almost at a 90-degree angle.Another indication that the two figures belong together is the fact that they are both made to the same scale -- both figures were originally just under 30 centimeters (11.7 inches) tall.Anyone able to answer these questions could unlock many of the sexual secrets of primeval times.

American anthropologist Helen Fisher believes that Stone Age women "were constantly disappearing into the bushes with different partners." The scenario portrayed by the other camp is quite the opposite.The only depictions of sexual activity known until now were Greek paintings, but they were created more than 4,000 years later. When it comes to the love lives of our diluvial ancestors, scientists quickly start running out of ideas.Given this enormous difference in time, the Saxony find has created some confusion. Archäo, a professional journal, speculates that it may have been "chic" to display these types of sculptures in the "houses of the first farmers between the Saale and Elbe rivers." Researchers speculate that the figure could also be evidence of a "fertility cult" -- a theory that sounds as straightforward as it is vague. The social behavior of early human beings was neglected for far too long, complains historian Angelika Dierichs.Who invented the incest taboo and the concept of monogamy in marriage?Did all the members of an extended family sleep in the same grass hut among the Neanderthals?

American anthropologist Helen Fisher believes that Stone Age women "were constantly disappearing into the bushes with different partners." The scenario portrayed by the other camp is quite the opposite.The only depictions of sexual activity known until now were Greek paintings, but they were created more than 4,000 years later. When it comes to the love lives of our diluvial ancestors, scientists quickly start running out of ideas.Given this enormous difference in time, the Saxony find has created some confusion. Archäo, a professional journal, speculates that it may have been "chic" to display these types of sculptures in the "houses of the first farmers between the Saale and Elbe rivers." Researchers speculate that the figure could also be evidence of a "fertility cult" -- a theory that sounds as straightforward as it is vague. The social behavior of early human beings was neglected for far too long, complains historian Angelika Dierichs.Who invented the incest taboo and the concept of monogamy in marriage?Did all the members of an extended family sleep in the same grass hut among the Neanderthals?Socio-biologists, on the other hand, see them as evidence that the early farmers had only one thing on their minds -- and that they were having sex with one another whenever they felt the urge.