Pyrex pattern dating

28-Feb-2020 06:02

This gave Pyrex a leg up on an emerging market-the rise of the British housewife and Ja J’s Pyrex was the first product direcetly marketed to the housewife.

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A clear borosilicate glass Pyrex measuring cup produced by Corning (right) and a clear tempered Pyrex soda-lime glass measuring cup produced by World Kitchen (left, differentiated by its different logo and bluish tint) Older clear-glass Pyrex manufactured by Corning, Arc International's Pyrex products, and Pyrex laboratory glassware is made of borosilicate glass.In the late 1930s and 1940s, Corning also introduced other products under the Pyrex brand, including opaque tempered soda-lime glass for bowls and bakeware, and a line of Pyrex Flameware for stovetop use; this borosilicate glass had a bluish tint caused by the addition of alumino-sulfate. Over the years, designers such as Penny Sparke, Betty Baugh, Smart Design, TEAMS Design, and others have contributed to the design of the line.In 1958 an internal design department was started by John B. Corning divested itself of the Corning Consumer Products Company (now known as Corelle Brands) in 1998 and production of consumer Pyrex products went with it.According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, borosilicate Pyrex is composed of (as percentage of weight): 4.0% boron, 54.0% oxygen, 2.8% sodium, 1.1% aluminum, 37.7% silicon, and 0.3% potassium., Beginning in the 1980s, production of Pyrex glass cookware manufactured by Corning (and later Corelle Brands, after the consumer division was spun off and renamed) was shifted to tempered soda-lime glass, like their opal bakeware.This change was justified by stating that soda-lime glass has higher mechanical strength than borosilicate—making it more resistant to physical damage when dropped, which is believed to be the most common cause of breakage in glass bakeware.

A clear borosilicate glass Pyrex measuring cup produced by Corning (right) and a clear tempered Pyrex soda-lime glass measuring cup produced by World Kitchen (left, differentiated by its different logo and bluish tint) Older clear-glass Pyrex manufactured by Corning, Arc International's Pyrex products, and Pyrex laboratory glassware is made of borosilicate glass.

In the late 1930s and 1940s, Corning also introduced other products under the Pyrex brand, including opaque tempered soda-lime glass for bowls and bakeware, and a line of Pyrex Flameware for stovetop use; this borosilicate glass had a bluish tint caused by the addition of alumino-sulfate. Over the years, designers such as Penny Sparke, Betty Baugh, Smart Design, TEAMS Design, and others have contributed to the design of the line.

In 1958 an internal design department was started by John B. Corning divested itself of the Corning Consumer Products Company (now known as Corelle Brands) in 1998 and production of consumer Pyrex products went with it.

According to the National Institute of Standards and Technology, borosilicate Pyrex is composed of (as percentage of weight): 4.0% boron, 54.0% oxygen, 2.8% sodium, 1.1% aluminum, 37.7% silicon, and 0.3% potassium., Beginning in the 1980s, production of Pyrex glass cookware manufactured by Corning (and later Corelle Brands, after the consumer division was spun off and renamed) was shifted to tempered soda-lime glass, like their opal bakeware.

This change was justified by stating that soda-lime glass has higher mechanical strength than borosilicate—making it more resistant to physical damage when dropped, which is believed to be the most common cause of breakage in glass bakeware.

Borosilicate glass was first made by German chemist and glass technologist Otto Schott, founder of Schott AG in 1893, 22 years before Corning produced the Pyrex brand. In 1908, Eugene Sullivan, director of research at Corning Glass Works, developed Nonex, a borosilicate low-expansion glass, to reduce breakage in shock-resistant lantern globes and battery jars.