Rodney dangerfield dating quotes

10-Nov-2019 05:44

For Rodney Dangerfield, cool is a dial on a Fedders.

He sets fear on parade, and all its consequences are his best punch lines.

Research reveals that Rodney Dangerfield is the sap in his own family tree. Elevator operators eye him and always say the same thing: “Basement?

” On a night out in a Chinese restaurant, he opens his fortune cookie and gets the check from the next table. And of course—as a connoisseur of the hairsbreadth art of stand-up comedy will tell you—no respect.

“I dropped out of show business once,” he often confesses in his act.

“But nobody noticed.” He went into business selling paint, and scribbled jokes between appointments.

In Caddyshack, Rodney shows up as a real estate developer who dresses in color combinations out of a Sherwin-Williams sample book and outrages the gentry at the local country club with such reflections as, “You look at that kid, you know why tigers eat their young.” Rodney must compete for attention in the film with alumni of Saturday Night Live and one mechanical gopher.

He draws more laughs than the TV kids and chews up at least as much of the screen as the rodent. He may be trying to loosen his tie, but it looks as if he is trying to strangle himself.

The following reviews of his live shows were those Rodney cherished.Rodney hung around with her I son, who was in the Navy then. If the Catskills were the training ground for that time, a Broadway drugstore called Hanson’s was the laboratory.Rodney, Lenny and a lot of other young guys hung out in the back booths, nursing coffee, nailing each other with wild ideas, gags, nutty notions for routines. Some, like Joe Ancis, were brilliant in the booth and on the street; Bruce once admitted that he owed maybe a third of his act to Joe.Jack Benny once told Dangerfield that his signature line—”I don’t get no respect”—cuts right to everyone’s soul.Indeed, Dangerfield’s best comedy is based on a futile lashing out against misery, often sexual and always social.

The following reviews of his live shows were those Rodney cherished.

Rodney hung around with her I son, who was in the Navy then. If the Catskills were the training ground for that time, a Broadway drugstore called Hanson’s was the laboratory.

Rodney, Lenny and a lot of other young guys hung out in the back booths, nursing coffee, nailing each other with wild ideas, gags, nutty notions for routines. Some, like Joe Ancis, were brilliant in the booth and on the street; Bruce once admitted that he owed maybe a third of his act to Joe.

Jack Benny once told Dangerfield that his signature line—”I don’t get no respect”—cuts right to everyone’s soul.

Indeed, Dangerfield’s best comedy is based on a futile lashing out against misery, often sexual and always social.

“During sex my wife wants to talk to me,” he confesses, then adds: “The other night she called me from a hotel.” Even Dangerfield’s silliest gags have the sting of truth.