Soundtrack we are dating now

12-Jan-2020 17:07

Over the past decade, Horse Feathers has evolved from a duo crafting lonely, introverted folk tunes draped in delicate strings to a 10-piece ensemble fully embracing the jubilant sound of heartland rock on Appreciation .

Just like the Americana-dwelling bands that came before them (not the least of which, The Band), all the signifiers are in place: honky-tonk piano, whining pedal steel, bright church organ, and a gospel-like conviction given to every word.

The tracks are both summery and swoony with a late-night dance floor sensibility. The sultry “Work It” was co-written with his son Jeffrey Osborne, Jr. As roots-based groups seem to fetishize analog recording in search of what "authentic" sounds like, Mt.

Joy feels completely natural with their combination of Appalachian field recordings, '70s rock, and top 40 jams. Joy smashed the Spotify play charts with "Astrovan," an instantly catchy single with bizarre lyrical imagery that's equal parts surreal, sad, and comical and seems to have been born from a few puffs of God's green herb. guitar twang channeled right out of their hits, along with Matt Quinn's doped-out vocals.

In the age of over-produced, over-electronic music, Mt. British blues-rock stalwart Joe Bonamassa celebrates the masters on this new live album, featuring classics by Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page and more.

Recorded with a crack 5-piece band at Greenwich Music Time in London in 2016, he held the audience in thrall with sizzling versions of Clapton's “Mainline Florida,” Beck's “Spanish Boots,” Zeppelin's “I Can't Quit You Baby,” and the like.

"Sheep" is one of the most beautiful tracks on the album and shows the influence of neo-soul with the Fender Rhodes providing gentle harmonies behind Quinn's powerful vocals.

The song oozes with insecurity disguised by lyrics that start to delve into Bob Dylan level imagery and free association about being in disguise, bloody streets, and awkward encounters. Joy almost feels like a contemporary take on the post-folk artists of the '60s.

The hell with it, then: Appreciation feels like a friendly slap on the back. Most of all, Appreciation feels like Horse Feathers’ most complete and realized statement yet. Matthew Sweet’s latest, Tomorrow’s Daughter , came from the same fruitful sessions that yielded last year’s excellent Tomorrow Forever .Yet the production has all of today's modern flair without a hint of misguided nostalgia.Mt Joy's self-titled debut continues the style that's just as perfectly constructed as their first single.Electric Light is the perfect second album that shows off delicately constructed songs that are light and catchy, but have thick textures and harmonics mixed with poetic, playful lyrics that elevate each track into Lorde-like jams.Yes, he's dropped the wide-brimmed hat and long hair for a sleeker look, but his songwriter is still what we came here for.

The hell with it, then: Appreciation feels like a friendly slap on the back. Most of all, Appreciation feels like Horse Feathers’ most complete and realized statement yet. Matthew Sweet’s latest, Tomorrow’s Daughter , came from the same fruitful sessions that yielded last year’s excellent Tomorrow Forever .Yet the production has all of today's modern flair without a hint of misguided nostalgia.Mt Joy's self-titled debut continues the style that's just as perfectly constructed as their first single.Electric Light is the perfect second album that shows off delicately constructed songs that are light and catchy, but have thick textures and harmonics mixed with poetic, playful lyrics that elevate each track into Lorde-like jams.Yes, he's dropped the wide-brimmed hat and long hair for a sleeker look, but his songwriter is still what we came here for.It shows off some good ol' fashioned songwriting prowess that's sorely missing from rock today.