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19-Sep-2019 23:06

Current scientific consensus is that most, and perhaps all, cases of SHC involve overlooked external sources of ignition."Spontaneous human combustion" refers to the death from a fire originating without an apparent external source of ignition; the fire is believed to start within the body of the victim.

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According to Nickell and Fischer's investigation, nearby objects often remained undamaged because fire tends to burn upward, but burns laterally with some difficulty.

The doctor, Ciaran Mc Loughlin, made this statement at the inquiry into the death: "This fire was thoroughly investigated and I'm left with the conclusion that this fits into the category of spontaneous human combustion, for which there is no adequate explanation." The most recent reported case of apparent SHC occurred in the early afternoon of 17 September 2017 in Tottenham, north London, when a 70-year-old pensioner, John Nolan from County Mayo in Ireland, appeared to spontaneously burst into flames while walking in the street.

Some passers-by tried to help him at the scene and he was airlifted to hospital where he died the next day, having suffered severe third-degree burns on 65% of his body.

This idea and the term 'spontaneous human combustion' were both first proposed in 1746 by Paul Rolli in an article published in the Philosophical Transactions.

Writing in The British Medical Journal in 1938, coroner Gavin Thurston describes the phenomenon as having "attracted the attention not only of the medical profession but of the laity" as early as 1834 (more than one hundred years prior to Thurston's article).

According to Nickell and Fischer's investigation, nearby objects often remained undamaged because fire tends to burn upward, but burns laterally with some difficulty.

The doctor, Ciaran Mc Loughlin, made this statement at the inquiry into the death: "This fire was thoroughly investigated and I'm left with the conclusion that this fits into the category of spontaneous human combustion, for which there is no adequate explanation." The most recent reported case of apparent SHC occurred in the early afternoon of 17 September 2017 in Tottenham, north London, when a 70-year-old pensioner, John Nolan from County Mayo in Ireland, appeared to spontaneously burst into flames while walking in the street.

Some passers-by tried to help him at the scene and he was airlifted to hospital where he died the next day, having suffered severe third-degree burns on 65% of his body.

This idea and the term 'spontaneous human combustion' were both first proposed in 1746 by Paul Rolli in an article published in the Philosophical Transactions.

Writing in The British Medical Journal in 1938, coroner Gavin Thurston describes the phenomenon as having "attracted the attention not only of the medical profession but of the laity" as early as 1834 (more than one hundred years prior to Thurston's article).

His entire body was incinerated, leaving only his skull and a portion of each leg below the knee.