Stone staffordshire dating Flash chat sexe free

15-Jan-2020 08:11

While the 'Patent' was real enough, 'Ironstone China' was a misnomer: it isn't from the East, it's not made of porcelain and the iron content is questionable, chemical analysis revealing an iron oxide content of only half of one per cent, although Mason's published recipe expounds at length on the preparation of the ironstone and iron slag components. It seems likely that, in the cut-throat business of the Staffordshire ceramics industry, Charles Mason took care to provide his competitors with industrial disinformation - a bogus recipe.

That his precautions were well-founded is testified by the subsequent roll-call of no less than 172 ironstone manufacturing firms established or merged in Staffordshire since the early 1800s, many using a style of mark intended to suggest a Mason's origin.

Whatever the true nature of Mason's ceramic process, the name itself - taking strength from the paradox of strong iron blended with fine china - proved to be a marketing triumph: not only was the new 'ironstone' seemingly as hard and durable as iron, but it took advantage, by exploiting designs largely inspired by the Chinese export porcelain trade, of the demand for Oriental china patterns, a taste which had been frustrated by the curtailment of bulk imports of Chinese wares in the 1790s and by the imposition of taxes on residual porcelain imports. The Turner family of Lane End, Staffordshire, had, thirteen years previously, taken out a patent for 'a new method, or methods of manufacturing porcelain and earthenware' (1800).

Confronted with a demand which could no longer be supplied, Miles Mason turned his entrepreneurial hand to ceramic manufacture: thus he entered into partnerships both in Staffordshire and in Liverpool (1796), the former producing earthenware, the latter a fine white porcelain, moving on to Lane Delph in Staffordshire in 1800, the year of the Turners' patent.

Mason's patent expired in 1827, by which time competitors with similar products were already under way.

Though ironstone manufacturers continued into our own century, many of the later wares simply repeat the ironstone style of the first half of the 19th century, echoing the works of makers such as Spode/Copeland, Hicks & Meigh, Folch, Ridgway, but above all, Mason's.

The glaze, however, is not so flinty hard and has a soft 'orange-peel' texture.

It lends itself to decoration in underglaze blue as well as over-glaze enamels.

Confronted with a demand which could no longer be supplied, Miles Mason turned his entrepreneurial hand to ceramic manufacture: thus he entered into partnerships both in Staffordshire and in Liverpool (1796), the former producing earthenware, the latter a fine white porcelain, moving on to Lane Delph in Staffordshire in 1800, the year of the Turners' patent.

Mason's patent expired in 1827, by which time competitors with similar products were already under way.

Though ironstone manufacturers continued into our own century, many of the later wares simply repeat the ironstone style of the first half of the 19th century, echoing the works of makers such as Spode/Copeland, Hicks & Meigh, Folch, Ridgway, but above all, Mason's.

The glaze, however, is not so flinty hard and has a soft 'orange-peel' texture.

It lends itself to decoration in underglaze blue as well as over-glaze enamels.

By arranging not to bid against one another, lots were purchased at low prices and re-auctioneed at a private 'knock-out' or 'settlement' exclusive to members of the ring, the difference between the public and the 'private' hammer prices being shared out among members of the group.