Updating bios administrator soko and matthew gray gubler dating

22-Dec-2019 12:25

There is another way to locate the BIOS level from the Linux command line and I rebooted into Fedora 25 and used the dmidecode command to locate the current BIOS.The -t option specifies the type information to be displayed, in this case, type 0 is for BIOS information.This information is from one of the hosts I upgraded after doing the BIOS upgrade.Well, I wasn't thinking about writing about this at that point in my travails.The motherboard documentation—yes, I download and keep it—translated that as meaning the system had a memory error.Of course, it was perfectly good memory right in the middle of the spec for the new processor.These are the fastest ones available for those motherboards and my research on the Intel website revealed that these processors would work.I also purchased non-standard CPU coolers with a higher cooling capacity than the ones that come packaged with the CPUs.

This at least allowed the system to boot and let me get to BIOS to check the BIOS version level and, using the Intel support website, found that to be many levels behind the most current.

I don't know for certain what the last field is, but I think it might be a time in 24-hour format so that the last three fields represent the date and time the BIOS was compiled.

My original BIOS was version 23 and, according to the Intel website, the most current version is 120.

At the time these were pretty close to state of the art but not top of the line. In addition, I use one for testing Fedora upgrades and other new software, and I use the other as a firewall and router for my network.

I installed Core i3 G620 CPUs with 2 cores and no hyperthreading at 2.6GHz. To upgrade, I purchased a pair of unlocked Intel 17-3770K at 3.5GHz processors to replace the existing ones.

This at least allowed the system to boot and let me get to BIOS to check the BIOS version level and, using the Intel support website, found that to be many levels behind the most current.

I don't know for certain what the last field is, but I think it might be a time in 24-hour format so that the last three fields represent the date and time the BIOS was compiled.

My original BIOS was version 23 and, according to the Intel website, the most current version is 120.

At the time these were pretty close to state of the art but not top of the line. In addition, I use one for testing Fedora upgrades and other new software, and I use the other as a firewall and router for my network.

I installed Core i3 G620 CPUs with 2 cores and no hyperthreading at 2.6GHz. To upgrade, I purchased a pair of unlocked Intel 17-3770K at 3.5GHz processors to replace the existing ones.

After receiving the replacement processors I installed one in the test system because it does not perform any tasks critical to my network.