Updating your video card

08-Feb-2020 14:18

Underclocking reduces the clock rates of your GPU or video RAM.

Reducing clock rates lowers the temperature of the chips and often allows weak ones to work properly.

You can often get an idea of which is causing the problem by looking carefully at the artifacts.

If your artifacts are covering the entire screen and involve color shifts or slight position shifts, then the problem may be caused by your monitor.

The overclock may work properly at first and then artifacts only start showing up weeks or months later after the chips have been sufficiently damaged.

A lot of hardware must be functioning properly to generate images correctly but there are three main sources of problems: the video RAM on your video card, the GPU which is the main chip on the video card which does the drawing, and the bus interface which transfers data between your video card and your motherboard.

There are instructions on how to underclock your video card on this page.

And if you're overclocking your video card then you should back off on your overclock. Excessive overclocks can raise the temperature enough to cause cumulative damage.

The temperature of the video card increases when running 3D programs like games.

If the artifacts go away then you know that you have an overheating problem.

Another thing you can try to reduce artifacts is to underclock your video card.

Images are made on a computer by adding the red, green, and blue component parts of an image together to make the final color.

Those areas in the sky are shifted yellow because the bad video RAM in this case holds the blue component and too little blue results in a shift to yellow.

The temperature of the video card increases when running 3D programs like games.

If the artifacts go away then you know that you have an overheating problem.

Another thing you can try to reduce artifacts is to underclock your video card.

Images are made on a computer by adding the red, green, and blue component parts of an image together to make the final color.

Those areas in the sky are shifted yellow because the bad video RAM in this case holds the blue component and too little blue results in a shift to yellow.

If you see artifacts during the power-up screens before your operating system loads then you know it has nothing to do with drivers. If you're seeing visual artifacts in just one program then it may be a software problem with that program.